7 Best Watering Wands (Reviews & Guide of 2019)

Keeping your plants watered regularly is essential to a healthy garden. But lugging around a watering can is hard work, especially if you’re lucky enough to have a big plot. So why not relax and let a watering wand take the strain?

Here we review seven of the best watering wands on the market today. And we take a look at the features to consider when making your choice.

Best Watering Wand for your garden 2019

1. Orbit Hose-End 58674N 9-Pattern Turret Wand (Our Top Recommended)

 

With its angled head, this watering wand from Orbit looks like you could swing it on the golf course. But its neat design allows you to direct the stream of water very accurately. That means efficient use of water – and no slippery surfaces when you’re watering pot plants on patios.

You can adjust the angle of the head by over 180 degrees. That will allow you to hit your target easily, even in tight corners.

It’s easy to use too. Just select your desired setting and leave the control yoke in place. There’s no need to continue squeezing a trigger to keep the water flowing, as with some other wands.

That makes it easier on your hands. It also means you can keep it running when you’ve finished. Yes, you’ll use a little more water. But you won’t risk water flowing back into your tap as you dash up the garden to turn it off.

You can choose from no fewer than nine different settings. If you want to protect delicate plants, there’s a “mist” mode. And a “jet” mode will squirt a fast stream of water at least thirty feet. (That’s great for mucking about with the kids on a summer day!)

If you’ve got long rows of plants to water – a vegetable patch, say – the “fan” and “flat” modes are ideal. And if you need to fill a watering can without splashing everywhere, choose the “flood” setting. Other options are “angle”, “cone” and “center”.

In short, whatever your watering needs, there’s a setting to suit.

There are a couple of things to bear in mind before deciding this is the wand for you.

First up, there’s the length of the wand itself. It’s a full three feet long. When you’ve neatly wound up your expandable hose, you’ll have a lengthy wand dangling free. You could always remove it if that bothers you – but it’s a pain.

It has also been known to spring leaks, sometimes after quite short periods of use. If you buy one and have this problem, check the rubber washer inside. It may need to be replaced.

Pros:

  • A water setting to meet every possible need
  • You can adjust the angle of the head to direct the water accurately, even in awkward spots
  • No need to keep squeezing a trigger to keep the water flowing

Cons:

  • Its length means it’s more awkward to store than some wands
  • Prone to leaks – you may need to replace a washer.

2. GREEN MOUNT Watering Wand

 

If you’re looking for a medium-length wand, this one from Green Mount should make your shortlist.

It’s two feet long, and it’s made from aluminum, so is both strong and light. We really like the shiny blue finish too.

The watering head has an impressive 661 tiny holes. That makes it possible to get a very fine and light spray. It works brilliantly on both tender plants and seed beds. You won’t have to worry about damaged buds, or a firm jet of water washing seeds away!

It doesn’t have the range of settings available with the Orbit reviewed earlier. You can, though, adjust the volume of the water to change the pressure. Simply turn a dial on the handle to increase or decrease the flow as gradually as you want.

The head is positioned at an angle, but it isn’t possible to change that. There’s also a gentle curve along the line of the wand. Both are designed to provide a gentle shower over your plants.

The handle is cushioned for comfortable use. And there’s a soft foam coating further down the wand to rest your other hand if watering for long periods.

The watering mechanism is engaged with a trigger. It’s easy to use, and can be locked in position so you don’t have to keep squeezing as you water. That’s great for anyone suffering from arthritis.

This is an excellent wand for watering, but you’ll have to remove it if you want jets of water. If you regularly use your hose for other purposes – to top up a garden pond, say – there are better options.

Pros:

  • Light, strong aluminum construction and excellent build quality
  • 661 holes in the watering head allow for a very fine, light spray
  • Comfortable cushioned handle

Cons:

  • The angle of the spray head is fixed
  • Only one spray pattern – this is for watering plants only.

3. The Relaxed Gardener Watering Wand

 

One of the shortest wands to make our list, this one from The Relaxed Gardener is just 15 inches long. It’s a good choice for smaller gardens. You won’t have to stand well back from your flower beds to give them a good drink. And it’s still long enough to reach hanging baskets.

Despite its small size, it comes with a range of different features.

First up are the eight different spray patterns. They will give you all the versatility you need from your hose without having to change nozzles.

Whether watering young plants, washing down a garden path, or filling a watering can, there’s a setting to suit. Select it by turning a dial at the end of the wand.

You can also adjust the strength of the water flow. That’s done with a lever operated by your thumb. It’s the same lever that switches the water on and off. Push it all the way up for maximum water volume, and all the way down to stop the flow.

It couldn’t be easier to use, and there’s no need to squeeze a trigger to get it started. There isn’t, though, any way to change the angle of the spray head.

The wand is made of aluminum, so it’s light and durable, and there’s a non-slip grip. The shorter length means it’s convenient to store too.

We’ve heard stories of leaks, but also good things about The Relaxed Gardener’s customer service. And it comes with a reassuring 90-day money-back guarantee.

If you’ve got deep flower beds that mean you need a longer spray, choose another wand. But for more modest gardens, this is a good quality gizmo that’s simple to use and store.

Pros:

  • Eight different spray patterns
  • Short wand is long enough for hanging baskets but convenient to store
  • Lever operation is simple to use and won’t strain your hands

Cons

  • There’s no way to change the angle of the watering head
  • Won’t reach to the back of very deep flower beds.

4. Ikris Garden Hose Wand One-Touch Sprayer

ikris Garden Hose Wand

Image: ikris

ikris make a range of watering wands, but this 33-inch version is our favorite. It’s another wand that looks a bit like a golf club, and the head can be adjusted to any angle. If you need to water odd nooks and crannies, it will suit you down to the ground.

The long arm means you can reach right into the middle of mature shrubs for thorough watering. The downside, of course, is that you’ll have 33 inches of wand to store when you’ve finished.

The thumb control is similar to the wand from The Relaxed Gardener. Just push the lever into position to turn it on, with no need to squeeze a stiff trigger.

This one comes with no fewer than ten different spray patterns. All the options you’d want for watering your plant, no matter how delicate, are present and correct. And if you want a faster flow, the “rinse” setting forces the water through a single 3mm wide opening.

Oddly, though, there’s no “full” setting with this wand. Want to use it to fill a watering can to water inside a greenhouse? You’ll have to use the “rinse” function instead. Unfortunately, the higher pressure of this setting means you’ll have to put up with a bit of splashing.

While the arm here is aluminum, the spray head and lever are both plastic. That’s pretty standard for a watering wand, but we’ve heard tales of the plastic splitting. Ikris do, however, say they stand behind their product and offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

Pros:

  • 33-inch wand offers a generous reach
  • Adjustable head to reach into those awkward nooks and crannies
  • Ten different settings cover all plant-spraying needs

Cons:

  • No “full” setting – so you’ll have to cope with splashes if you use it to fill your watering can
  • Plastic lever and spray head have been known to split.

5. Orbit 58995 Pro Flo 7-Pattern Thumb Control D-Grip Wand

 

The second watering wand from Orbit to make our list, the 58995 is also the shortest at just 14 inches. In this case, however, good things really do come in little packages.

There are seven different watering patterns here. For fragile plants or to conserve water, use “mist”. “Flat” produces a wide flat stream of water, perfect for rows of vegetables. And there are higher pressure options too: “full” for filling a watering can, and “jet” for washing the car.

There are, though, some minor gripes. If you like the “soaker” setting on other wands, you’ll be out of luck. It isn’t included here. And the “center” setting has fewer streams of water than other examples.

The spray pattern is selected by a dial at the business end of the wand. It’s easy to turn, with a textured design so it won’t slip even when wet.

There’s a similar textured finish on the hand grip, which is nicely cushioned. And its D-shape construction means it doubles as a handy hanging hook when you’ve finished watering.

There are no triggers to squeeze here, so nothing to tire your hand. Just push up the lever to start the water flow and pull it back down to stop it. It’s smooth enough to be operated with just your thumb.

You don’t get all the features of the larger Orbit here. There are slightly fewer spray patterns, and you can’t adjust the head. The combination of the shorter arm and fixed head mean this isn’t as good at reaching tricky spots. And for large gardens and deep flower beds, it’s not the best choice.

It is, though, very convenient for more modest plots. And those 14 inches are still plenty long enough to reach into hanging baskets.

Pros:

  • Seven different spray patterns
  • Textured handle and spray selector dial stay non-slip, even when wet
  • Lever operation won’t tire your hand

Cons:

  • Spray head is fixed in position
  • No “soaker” setting, and the “center” setting won’t be to everyone’s liking.

6. Melnor 7-Pattern Watering Wand 

 

Melnor’s sprayer combines a shorter wand length with an adjustable head. It makes for a wand that works well with awkward spaces in smaller gardens.

The head is adjusted with a simple pivot at the end. It gives a decent range of movement, allowing you to easily water under, over, or to the side of obstacles. There’s a built-in water cut-off and flow control too.

There are seven different spray patterns here, including “flat”, “mist”, “shower” and “jet”. Between them, those options will cover everything from gentle watering of seedlings to washing the patio. As with the Orbit 58995, however, this one doesn’t include the “soaker” option.

You will need to squeeze a trigger to keep the water flowing. This was once the standard method of operation for watering wands, and for most gardeners, it will be fine. The handle is contoured to be easy to hold, and both the handle and trigger have a non-slip finish.

But if you struggle with pain or stiffness in your hands, or water for long periods, choose a different model. Keeping the trigger squeezed takes a bit of effort and can cause aches and pains.

At sixteen inches, this isn’t the longest wand on our list. It makes it a compact option when it comes to storage, and you’ll still reach those hanging baskets. But gardeners with more extensive grounds will find a longer wand more convenient.

Pros:

  • Nice range of spray patterns
  • Adjustable head allows you to spray from all angles
  • Shorter wand makes for easy storage

Cons:

  • Trigger operation can be hard on your hands, particularly if watering for long periods
  • Won’t be the best choice if your herbaceous borders are nice and deep.

7. Dramm 14804 One Touch Rain Wand With One Touch Valve

Dramm One Touch Rain Wand

Image: rainwand

Dramm’s rain wand is made from aluminum, and it’s both sturdy and light enough to be maneuvered easily.

There’s a veritable rainbow of color options. Choose between red, orange, yellow, green, blue and berry. If that wasn’t cool enough, Dramm offers its premium rubber hose in the same shades. For those who like their gardening kit to coordinate with their flowers, it’s the only possible choice!

The wand here is 30 inches. While not the longest on our list, it will still give you a pretty impressive watering range. (The exact distance will, of course, depend on the water pressure in your tap.)

The head is at a fixed angle, and there are no different spray patterns on offer here. What you get is a high-quality spray head with around 770 tiny holes. They’ll give you a light, fine spray that avoids damage to plants and is quickly absorbed by the soil.

If you want to use your (color-coordinated) hose for things other than watering plants, though, you’ll need a different nozzle.

This is another wand that uses a simple lever operation. When the lever is at the bottom, the water is switched off. When it’s at the top, it’s on full tilt. Pick any spot in between to fine-tune the flow.

The lever is light enough to be operated with just your thumb. It’s easy to turn off the water as you move between plants, making it an environmentally friendly option. (And if you have a water meter, it’s cost-effective too.)

It’s not, though, the best option if you have low water pressure. You’ll find the water dribbles out of the end. The same applies if you’re using a long hose – it works best with hoses under 75 feet.

On the other end of the scale, if your water pressure is high, take care with that lever! Accidentally push it up too high, and you risk drowning your plants.

Pros:

  • Fantastic range of colors – and coordinating hose!
  • Good build quality, with around 770 tiny holes in the spray head
  • One-touch lever operation

Cons:

  • Single spray pattern means limited ability to compensate for low or high water pressure
  • Fixed position watering head.


Buying guide

Watering Wand

If you’re still confused about which is the best watering wand for you, don’t worry! We’re about to give you all the information you need to make the right choice.

How do you use your hose?

Hose Wand

The first thing to think about is the way in which you use your garden hose reel. Do you use it solely for watering plants? Or does it have to perform other functions too?

Perhaps you have a garden pond that needs topping up from time to time. Maybe you use your hose to wash down paving stones or decking. Will you need to fill a watering can – perhaps to water plants in a greenhouse or terrarium? What about washing the car?

The answer to those questions will tell you whether or not you need a watering wand with multiple spray patterns. Multi-spray wands will allow you to change the way the water is dispensed, usually by turning a dial.

Select a light spray to water delicate plants without damaging them. A more concentrated stream of water is good for filling watering cans or topping up ponds. And a jet is perfect for washing hard landscaping or the car.

If, on the other hand, you just use your hose for watering plants, consider a simpler wand. These will often have more holes in the spray head, so you can get a finer mist.

What is your garden like?

Garden Watering Wand

How big space do you need to water? If you have very deep borders, you’ll need a wand that’s long enough to spray water right to the back.

If, on the other hand, your garden is smaller, a shorter wand will be easier to use. It will also have the advantage of being less bulky to store when you’ve finished with it.

Next, consider how easy it is to get to the spaces you want to water. If you have awkward angles to contend with, a wand with an adjustable head may be a wise investment. The ability to tilt it in any direction will make it much easier to reach around obstacles.

Ease of operation

Garden Hose Wand

Using some watering wands for long periods can be surprisingly hard on your hands. Wands that rely on you squeezing a trigger to keep the water flowing can require a lot of force. Even people without joint issues may be left with aching palms and fingers (as we know from experience).

If you’re going to be watering for a long time, or have arthritis or similar conditions, look for one-touch operation. These kinds of wands often use a lever to turn the water on and off, and to control flow. Other wands with a trigger will allow you to lock it in place.

Either design can make a big difference to the strain placed on your hands and wrists.

Ready to get watering?

We hope you’ve enjoyed our run-down of some of the best watering wands on the market. There’s a lot of choices out there, but don’t be overwhelmed. Follow our simple guide and you can be confident in making the right choice for your garden.

Our favorite is Orbit’s 9-pattern turret wand. Its choice of spray patterns and adjustable head make it one of the most versatile wands on our list. And it’s light and comfortable to use too.

Whichever wand you decide to use, your garden plants will thank you for it. Happy watering!